Vera Koo: How the Shooting Sports Saved My Life

By Vera Koo, Women's Outdoor News, January 24, 2016 More than 20 years ago, I found myself at the lowest point of my life. I had experienced a terrible personal crisis. Suffice it to say that this crisis was an external force that shattered my core values. I had built my beliefs based on certain principles, and this crisis destroyed those beliefs on which I had built my world, causing my world to fall apart. Go To Full Article | Translations:  簡體字 Simplified Chinese - 繁體字 Traditional Chinese

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  • January 30, 2016

Why You Must Shine Through

By Vera Koo, Women's Outdoor News, November 29, 2015 Vera Koo describes her journey to becoming one of the world’s finest shooters and how she overcame cultural obstacles and why you must shine through, too. My husband, Carlos, likes to tell a rendition of an old Chinese fable about a conniving fox who takes the form of a beautiful woman. Go To Full Article | Translations:  簡體字 Simplified Chinese - 繁體字 Traditional Chinese

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  • December 3, 2015

Vera Koo: How Windsurfing Kick-Started My Quest to Learn Other Sports

By Vera Koo, Women's Outdoor News, August 4, 2015 Before I met my husband, Carlos, I had no background in sports. I did not even take physical education classes in school. Carlos and I met before I turned 18 years old, and we married in 1969. One of my marriage philosophies is that anything my husband likes to do, I should learn it, because if my husband is interested in something, he will give me the time and support to learn that activity. And I try to never miss an opportunity to learn something. Go To Full Article | Translations:  日文 Japanese

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  • August 10, 2015

Vera Koo: From Dolls to Guns — My Journey to the Competition Shooting Sports

By Vera Koo, Women's Outdoor News, January 6, 2015 I did not grow up playing with toy guns. I grew up playing with dolls. In fact, as a child, I never had any interest in guns. I was raised in a very traditional Chinese family that valued women as nurturers and caretakers. My mother groomed me to be good wife, a good mother and a good daughter-in-law. Go To Full Article | Translations:  日文 Japanese - 簡體字 Simplified Chinese - 繁體字 Traditional Chinese

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  • January 7, 2015

Vera Koo: A champion’s mindset to the shooting sports

By Vera Koo, Women's Outdoor News, November 6, 2014 What does the world think a shooter looks like? Perhaps a middle-aged male, wearing camouflage or blaze orange, speaking with an accent, and driving a truck. Is that a stereotype? Is that our stereotype? That was the standard when I began shooting. But, today it is becoming less and less of a reality. I am not that shooter. Except for the orange. My closet is filled with orange. I speak with a slight accent and, I do, on occasion, drive a truck. Go To Full Article | Translations:  日文 Japanese - ...

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  • November 7, 2014

The future of women in shooting sports

By Vera Koo, Women's Outdoor News, February 20, 2014 Everyone has something that could make our world more extraordinary. People spend their entire lives perfecting that skill; ask any athlete, any diplomatic leader, Nobel Prize recipient or Oscar winner. As much as we would like to believe that we could compete on their stages (the armchair quarterback does not just play football,) do not presume that we could achieve their levels of success. Whether you dream of competing on their stages, or your own, I firmly believe in discovering these experts, wherever they may ...

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  • February 25, 2014

Shing ping

There is a Chinese word that sounds like: Shing Ping. It means having harmony in your heart and no axe to grind. Whether in competition, or in daily life, you are not fighting to win. You are not fighting to beat someone else. Fight to do a better job for yourself. Battle to do a job well. Whether you are in a peak or a valley of your life, be kind, forgive, and think about life’s longevity. On your darkest days, just kneel down. And pray. Help and hope will be there. My third child, Brian, died at 13 months. It took me a long time to find harmony in my heart ...

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  • May 16, 2013

Tiger mothers… for the greater good?

Tiger mothers, part II For my generation, we come from that kind of training. But my parents didn’t think that way. It was common knowledge that that was how you raised. You take up piano, you practice every day, even if you don’t like it. It was disciplinarian. I told my girls: if you like piano, if you love it: I will drive you, and I will pay: but you have to practice and love it. I will not sit next to you and force you to practice. Amy Chua’s view is not shocking to me. In some instance, maybe we will make a child who would not otherwise have any ...

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  • May 5, 2013

Are we all Amy Chua?

We all know Amy Chua’s type. We all know the children of the Tiger Mother. Some children do well with such mothers. Look at Olympians, look at champions, look at musicians, athletes, and academics. This is not to defend Amy Chua, or offend Amy Chua. Chinese parents as a people are very strict as to how their children perform academically. In China, it is so extreme that children frequently commit suicide because they cannot achieve standards of academics. They believe that failure is so shameful that it is unbearable. My childhood was different. I was the ...

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  • April 29, 2013

If you are near red, do you turn red?

If you are near red, do you turn red? If you are near white, do you turn white? If you are near black, do you turn black? The perceptions and expectations of your peers, (and whoever surrounds you) color your judgment, expectations, and beliefs far more than you might realize. As a first daughter in China and then Hong Kong, I was raised to be a wife. I was raised to be a good wife and a good mother. I was raised to find a husband and cater to his every need, to take care of our home and our children. But we moved. We moved from Hong Kong to San Francisco and ...

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  • April 24, 2013